vittoria haziel

"LEONARDO’S CONFESSION"
Turin Shroud, the sultan, the pope an historical enigma
by Vittoria Haziel


About the Author
Flash back
In London in July 2009 Lillian Schwartz compares Leonardo da Vinci’s celebrated Self-portrait to the face that appears in the Holy Shroud of Turin with the help of computer graphics. The conclusion is that the Tuscan genius is the author of the image of the Shroud, an image in which he portrayed himself.
Is this some sort of scoop? Not at all. The same had been stated in a book printed in England back in 1994 by two British authors, Picknett and Prince, who in turn cite the studies conducted by Vittoria Haziel. Information taken from the latter’s sources is used too many times by the British authors, who attribute such data as deriving from anonymous letters or from the voice of the master himself, coming back from the dead. She disassociated herself entirely from such a text, which demeans the important and scholarly level of her studies.
Since 1990, as a matter of fact, Vittoria Haziel has always given a strong scholarly approach to her studies, as sustained by most Italian press releases and in the long-selling, 1998-volume entitled “The Passion According to Leonardo”, published by Sperling & Kupfer (a paperback edition in 2005, with important integrations and sales overseas).
Haziel ‘s original ideas were in print way before Dan Brown’s: both in 1993 and again in 1998 (in the Italian magazine “Oggi”), she points out both the presence of the invisible knife and the female figure in the Last Supper in Milan; actually, she shows the document in which the artists refers to a woman amongst the apostles.“Giovannina, viso fantastico, sta a Santa Caterina allo spedale” (Near the Christ).
Daughter of a high official in the Italian police force, a degree in law, journalist and writer, Vittoria Haziel is the only person in the world who reproduced the shroud of Turin ta using Leonardo da Vinci’s technique.


Today
An extraordinary event which supports the theme of the book: as of April 10th next year Turin will exhibit the Shroud along with the master’s Self-portrait

About the book
The book sees the involvement of islam in the making of the most famous relic of Christianity, revelations on the oriental origins of Leonardo, his role in founding the Franc masonry and thus becomes a unique and precious volume for history lovers and readers with a passion for the arcane.
Besides, the book showcases something special for the history of art: a bust sculpture depicting Christ the Savior by the School of Verrocchio, attributed to Leonardo.
A youthful self-portrait? It can be compared to the face of the Shroud and that of the drawing in the Self-portrait.
Haziel’s investigation, contained in a thick dossier written with an informal style and enriched with ground-breaking interviews, is conducted like a real court case: evidence, historical documentation and witnesses all bring together the modus operandi and the signature of Leonardo da Vinci. The scholar even find traces of the artist’s initials, which are visible to the naked eye, decisive elements in any trial. Vittoria Haziel ventures so far as to give a new name to the secret work: “Icona da Vinci”.
The grounds for the authenticity of Turin’s relic appear shakier than ever, in spite of the Church’s attacks against scientific approaches. However, the cloth represents a visible Gospel, with its moving and strong image of Christ’s passion.
The contents of the book reveal how, first of all, the image could not be that of a three-dimensional human body, neither of a Jew, nor least of all of Jesus. Historical sources cite the inconsistency of the millenary voyage of the cloth (from Constantinople, to Edessa and Lirey). In fact, the cloth of Lirey was found to be false, as attested in two papal bulls, and the local bishop prohibited it from being exhibited to the faithful.
Numerous shrouds surfaced throughout the centuries in various places in Europe, till the royal Savoy family, the new owners of one in particular, declare its authenticity in 1506, based on its extraordinary realism. The “Icona da Vinci” had obviously replaced the old cloth, which had been condemned as a false sacred representation.
It is Leonardo’s secret masterpiece and calls to be included in his galaxy of endeavors. The reader is furnished with all the elements to do this and to recognize the true characteristics of the eclectic, bizarre and anti-clerical artist. Evidence comes from disclosed confessions in easily-visible codices and leonardesque writings. In recreating a fascinating interdisciplinary mosaic, the writer reveals artistic, historical and cabalistic connections between the cloth, its author and its patron. Once again, thanks to Leonardo ‘s secret code we are offered rock-hard proof of the reason for creating the shroud: Ottoman sultan Bajezid II, a Muslim, commissions the artist for a false relic. History tells of many an occasion on which the sultan gave relics as presents to ingratiate himself with European rulers, not to mention that he was well acquainted with Leonardo.
The book closes with a run-through of the falsehoods make public or left uncommented by the establishment which rejects any attacks against the authenticity of the Shroud. International media have come up with all sorts of lies, deceptions, hidden truths and obvious mistakes that have turned a issue of faith into a breach of one of unwonted arrogance in its abuse of popular credulity.

vittoria haziel